Save Money, Grow Your Own Veggies

garden

Edible gardens can save the average family as much as $500/yr

Why not save money and do something that’s good for your health at the same time?  Edible home gardens are becoming more popular these days for that very reason.  Thanks to a financial recession and an organic food craze, many non-gardeners are deciding to give it a try.

How much can you save?

According to studies conducted by W. Atlee Burpee Co. every $1 spent on seeds and supplies yields approximately $25 worth of produce. George Ball, owner of Burpee Co., says a $10 investment in seeds for tomatoes, beans, bell peppers, lettuce, peas, and carrots, plus $80 for soil, fertilizer, and the cost to build several raised beds, can yield more than $250 worth of produce.

Getting started

If you are new to gardening, then I would recommend spending some time on a site such as Burpee.com to get step by step guidance on what you will need. You could also enlist the services of a local garden club to advise you. The barrier to entry is surprisingly low and the average family of four only needs 200 sq. ft. of land to keep veggies on their plate all summer.  According to gardening experts, you should plan to spend 4 hours per week tending your garden with an additional 8 – 12 hours of prep time each spring.  The cost to buy your first batch of seeds and build your raised beds should cost between $80 – $250.

What to grow?

The most cost effective vegetables to grow include: slicing tomatoes, bell peppers, cucumbers, bush green beans, pole green beans, leaf lettuce, squash and spinach.  Learn more about the yield and savings of each of these by reading Julie Martens article “Save Money with Your Edible Garden”.

If you will be moving soon and think a garden isn’t worth the effort, think again. A well built edible garden could actually make your home more appealing to potential homebuyers!

*Source: “Save Money with Your Edible Garden” by Julie Martens and W. Atlee Burpee Co.

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